Author Archives: Peter Cutler

Herb Benham’s piece in the Bakersfield Californian, June 27, 2014

Herb

Herb Benham: Folk music in Tehachapi cool way to spend hot day

By HERB BENHAM, Californian columnist hbenham@bakersfield.com

Recently I drove to Tehachapi for a concert at Fiddlers Crossing featuring Eric Andersen, a folk singer I’d first heard 40 years ago with his song “Violets of the Dawn.”

Forty years can be hard on anybody, but 40 years in the music business is not like sitting on comfortable patio furniture watching the sun set. Who knew whether Andersen would be upright, drug-ravaged or float in on a magic carpet ride. He was one of the early Greenwich Village singers, along with Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Phil Ochs and Pete Seeger, and that was the last I’d heard of him.

A trip to Tehachapi was part of my summer strategy anyway. When you live in a hot place, it makes sense to have one; otherwise, you’re like a school of fish in a shrinking mud puddle.

The less experienced summerer thinks in large chunks, vacations so expansive they can block the sun.

That works if summer were two weeks rather than five months. A week in the mountains, 10 days at the beach, these are noble efforts. But you can’t run from a valley summer. Better to work with the heat, give it its due, respect its tenacity, bow to its ferocity and when it has let down its guard, sneak away for a few hours.

I left Bakersfield at 5 p.m., the temperature hovering around 100, my back sweaty, throat dry and prospects dimming.

When I reached Tehachapi 40 minutes later, it was in the low 80s, breezy and I felt like I had arrived at the gates of heaven with my best footwear.

I met friends at Kasagiri Restaurant, across the street from Fiddlers Crossing, described by owners Peter Cutler and Deborah Hand-Cutler as a “listening room.”

The Japanese food was good. I ordered tempura. I love tempura because you can disguise a piece of broccoli, shrimp or sweet potato in the light tempura batter and every bite is a surprise. It’s like opening a parade of presents Christmas morning.

After dinner, we walked across the street to the listening room. Scale is important, and to be able to walk from dinner to a concert is a pleasure.

Tehachapi is cute. At least downtown. The police station was close by and in case the old hippies began skirmishing, officers could stroll slowly across the street and gently separate the clashing tie-dyes.

The room at Fiddlers Crossing was cozy — 49 seats. It was like your living room with better stage lights and a sound board in the back operated by Peter that would make a grown audiophile drool. The kitchen, to the left, had tables and counters filled with cookies, cakes and freshly brewed coffee. It felt like Vermont, circa 1968.

A man stood in the back of the room wearing a black fedora. He wore the fedora in such a way that permanently eliminated it as future headwear for any man present.

No way that was Eric Andersen. That guy was supposed to be 71; this guy had an unlined face, looked 50 and as if he could bump Hugh Jackman from the cover of Men’s Health.

He adjusted the mike, strapped on his harmonica and started to play. After the first song, I wanted to call everybody I knew and tell them to drive to Tehachapi, drink in some fresh, mountain-washed, 80-degree air and listen to Eric Anderson play.

Garrison Keillor is a national treasure. So is Eric Andersen. I wanted to quit my job and follow him on the road, the next night at McCabe’s Guitar Shop in Santa Monica.

Great songs included “Foghorn,” “Thirsty Boots,” “Come to My Bedside My Darlin'” Blue Heart,” and “Sex with You.”

If you have iTunes, buy those songs now.

I shook his hand after the concert and told him he didn’t settle for cliches in his songwriting. He was polite but did not seem overly moved by my credentials. I rolled down the mountain in less than 40 minutes. Summer strategy, Tehachapi style.

Friday, October 24, 7:00pm– Freebo, singer-songwriter, with Ray Sodolsky, bass– $20.00

freebo-oct

 

To folk, rock and blues musicians, Freebo is an icon. During a 30-year career, he provided the solid bass foundation for such artists as Bonnie Raitt, John Mayall, Ringo Starr, Maria Muldaur, Neil Young and many other top names in blues and pop music As an in-demand bassest on stage and studio, he appeared on Saturday Night Live, Midnight Special, Muppets Tonight, and in concert with Spinal Tap. Over the last two decades, Freebo has also been reinventing himself as a compelling singer-songwriter and guitarist. He is now out front, giving inspiring and intimate concerts of songs that speak to the spiritual nature and yearnings of humanity.
Freebo will be making his third appearance at Fiddlers Crossing on Friday, October 24, at 7 pm, and will give a workshop the next day for guitar players and songwriters. Freebo leads a regular song-writing workshop in Bakersfield. He and his wife, Laurie, now make their home in California Hot Springs, in the foothills of the Southern Sierras.
Freebo says of his metamorphosis, “I never had any aspirations to be a songwriter,” but as I played with more and more people, I realized I had a lot of musical ideas, and as a bass player, I really couldn’t get them into the music. I finally realized that if I wanted to get these ideas out, the song was the place to do that.”
This yearning for more creative expression drove Freebo to begin a process of “deep inner discovery” and make the conscious decision to tackle the challenges of songwriting in middle age, at the height of his career. Now, more than 20 years later, he says that this creative process has taken him to “a much higher level as a human being.”
Perhaps it’s because he came to songwriting later in life that most of Freebo’s lyrics have a deep spiritual resonance. He sings about such things as the “inner angel” that guides him, about the end of a life well lived deserving “a standing ovation.” Audiences as Fiddlers Crossing have already given Freebo standing ovations.
Fiddlers Crossing is at 206 East F Street at Robinson Street, in Downtown Tehachapi. Tickets may be purchased online at fiddlerscrossing.org, or at Mountain Music, Tehachapi Treasure Trove, Tehachapi Furniture in Old Town, or Lucky’s Barbershop. To reserve tickets or pay by phone, call 661-823-9994. Tickets to the concert are $20, and as always, coffee and goodies are included. The concert begins at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30p.m.
The workshop will run from 10 am to 1 p.m. and cost $35. Freebo calls it, “Singer/songwriter 202 – right hand and left hand guitar techniques and shortcuts.” The workshop is aimed particularly at singers who accompany themselves on guitar, as well as songwriters and guitarists in general.

Special combo deal: concert and workshop, only $40.00! Call to take advantage of this. (661)-823-9994.

 

http://freebomusic.com/

 

 

 

 

Freebo’s bio is best stated by several writers who have reviewed his most recent CD, the aptly named “Something To Believe”….

PAUL ZOLLO, Songwriters On Songwriting: “Freebo is more than a beloved musician, he’s an institution. Most famous for the funkified precision and fluid soul of his bass playing for Bonnie Raitt, he’s also a longtime beloved studio cat, a musician’s musician, sought out for his greatness in the studio by everyone from Ringo and Dr. John to CSN, Joe Walsh, Aaron Neville, Maria Muldaur and the late great Willie DeVille. But Freebo is more than one of LA’s best players, as those in the know have known for a long time: he’s also a richly gifted and distinctive songwriter, as expressive in his writing as on a bass. If anyone has written a more poignant song about homelessness than “When There’s No Place Like Home”, I haven’t heard it yet. Because it’s aiming high, to write a song about a subject so hopeless without being hopelessly maudlin or cliché, so most songwriters don’t even try. Freebo does it with easy grace, as simple and right as the beautifully understated arrangement. It’s a song of kindred spirit, and it’s a remarkable amalgam of influences, as if Harold Arlen collaborated with Pete Seeger, a timelessly tuneful chorus with lyric of folk wisdom and compassion.”

Walt Falconer, CoolAlbumOfTheDay.com: “Listening to Freebo is like riding on a cumulus cloud of peaceful awareness. His songs are at once uplifting, while also serving as mini socio-economic history lessons interspersed with beautifully spiritual melodic love songs in his own cosmic blend of country/blues/folk/rock/soul ear-pleasing genre defying music”.

Janet Goodman, Music News Nashville: “Freebo’s intimate and go-down-easy personable vocals can tie in light-hearted fare, social commentary, and spiritual quest with love-sweet-love, and make it sound seamless”.

Russ Paris, Folkworks.org: “Standing Ovation is an astounding song which encompasses a profound view of life. It is destined to become a classic”.

Come see Freebo for yourself, and listen to this Folk/Rock/Blues legend and award winning singer/songwriter. You won’t be disappointed…and please, feel free to write your own review!

 

 

 

 

Saturday, December 20, 7:00pm “A Christmas Carol, read by Alex Zonn–$12.00

xmas-carol-zonnA Tehachapi Christmas tradition has found a new home this year. Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol,” read by Tehachapi’s own Alex Zonn, will be presented twice at Fiddlers Crossing this month, on Saturday, December 20, at 7:00 pm and Sunday, December 21, at 3:00 pm.

First published in 1843, “A Christmas Carol” is the story of a bitter old miser named Ebeneezer Scrooge and his transformation resulting from a supernatural visit from the ghost of his former buisiness partner, Jacob Marley, and the Ghosts of Christmases Past, Present, and Future. It has delighted audiences in theatrical and film adaptations for well over a century.

Alex Zonn is well known to Tehachapi audiences, having appeared in a number of Tehachapi Community Theater productions including “The Lion in Winter,” “It’s a Wonderful Life,” and the fully staged production of  “A Christmas Carol.” He has also directed some of TCT’s productions. He is an accomplished actor and voiceover artist with many credits to his name.

Fiddlers Crossing is at 206 East F Street at Robinson Street, in Downtown Tehachapi. Tickets may be purchased online at fiddlerscrossing.org, or at Mountain Music, Tehachapi Treasure Trove, Tehachapi Furniture in Old Town, or Lucky’s Barbershop. To reserve tickets or pay by phone, call 661-823-9994. Tickets to the readings are $12, and as always, coffee and goodies are included.  There are two shows being presented, Saturday, December 20, at 7:00 pm (doors open at 6:30pm sharp), and Sunday, December 21, at 3:00 pm (doors open at 2:30pm sharp).

Sunday, December 21, 3:00pm “A Christmas Carol”, read by Alex Zonn–$12.00

xmas-carol-zonn

 

A Tehachapi Christmas tradition has found a new home this year. Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol,” read by Tehachapi’s own Alex Zonn, will be presented twice at Fiddlers Crossing this month, on Saturday, December 20, at 7:00 pm and Sunday, December 21, at 3:00 pm.

First published in 1843, “A Christmas Carol” is the story of a bitter old miser named Ebeneezer Scrooge and his transformation resulting from a supernatural visit from the ghost of his former buisiness partner, Jacob Marley, and the Ghosts of Christmases Past, Present, and Future. It has delighted audiences in theatrical and film adaptations for well over a century.

Alex Zonn is well known to Tehachapi audiences, having appeared in a number of Tehachapi Community Theater productions including “The Lion in Winter,” “It’s a Wonderful Life,” and the fully staged production of  “A Christmas Carol.” He has also directed some of TCT’s productions. He is an accomplished actor and voiceover artist with many credits to his name.

Fiddlers Crossing is at 206 East F Street at Robinson Street, in Downtown Tehachapi. Tickets may be purchased online at fiddlerscrossing.org, or at Mountain Music, Tehachapi Treasure Trove, Tehachapi Furniture in Old Town, or Lucky’s Barbershop. To reserve tickets or pay by phone, call 661-823-9994. Tickets to the readings are $12, and as always, coffee and goodies are included.  There are two shows being presented, Saturday, December 20, at 7:00 pm (doors open at 6:30pm sharp), and Sunday, December 21, at 3:00 pm (doors open at 2:30pm sharp).

Friday, June 1, 2018, 7:00pm, First Friday Showcase, featuring Gary Stockdale, singer-songwriter, FREE EVENT (tips for the performers are strongly encouraged)

Gary Stockdale 1

http://garystockdale.com/

 

Gary Stockdale has an impressive resume:

Wonderful singer. Witty songwriter. Engaging performer. TV and film composer. Two EMMY nominations. A BMI award for music composition.

He plays piano and guitar. He has sung on many Henry Mancini movie scores. He has scored films for Roger Corman and others. He was an arranger for film composer Lalo Schifrin. He composed music for many Penn & Teller projects, as well as for television sitcoms including Sabrina the Teenage Witch.  He has sung on commercials, on TV and in films.

And then there’s his infectious grin.

Gary Stockdale will live up to his resume and then some when he returns to Fiddlers Crossing on Friday, June 1, at 7 p.m. as part of our First Friday Showcase series.

Music was part of his life growing up. His mother was a jazz singer before she gave it up to raise a family, and he sang in church choirs from an early age. Stockdale started piano lessons when he was only four, but in sixth grade, when the Beatles hit the airwaves, he switched to guitar.

He studied theater and music at Los Angeles City College, writing, performing, and directing the music for their shows. “After a time,” he said, “it became obvious that music was where my greatest abilities lay.”

Stockdale ignored his father’s advice to have something “to fall back on” other than show business. “I always figured if you have something to fall back on, if times get tough, you’ll fall back,” he said.  From college on, he was able to make a living in doing what he loved — either singing, playing music directing or writing music.

Stockdale’s singing credits range from being the solo singer on commercials for In-and-Out Burgers and singing a Paul McCartney sound-alike for a John Lennon miniseries on NBC, to creating “odd vocal sounds” in a chorus in the film “Avatar.” He said, “You can hear us most prominently in the scenes where the alien people are all sort of chanting and praying together.”

With a full body of work behind him, Stockdale now has the freedom to pursue his love of live performance, singing and playing piano and guitar. His songs are those of a man who sees the irony in life and is enjoying sharing it with his audience. Even his more serious songs have wit and humor in them.

And then there’s that grin….

 

Friday, June 8, 2018, 7:00pm, The Quitters, “High Octane Americana”, virtuoso guitar/vocal duo $20.00

Quitters

https://www.quittersduo.com/

 

As the late George Harrison once said in one of his best-known songs, “All Things Must Pass”. As great as they were, The Beatles went their separate ways in 1970. Each went on to have solo careers and play with other musicians. Artists need change once in a while to expand their horizons. So it is with Glenn Houston and Stevie Coyle, known collectively as The Quitters. The “High Octane Americana” duo will be performing at Fiddlers Crossing on Friday June 8 at 7pm.

Both men were founding members of The Waybacks, a very popular San Francisco-based Americana band formed back in 1998 that was, and still is, extremely popular on the festival circuit and at premier venues around the country. Stevie Coyle played rhythm guitar and sang with the band until 2007. Glenn Houston was the lead guitarist through 1999. In 2001 he joined Travis Jones, Chris Kee, Peter Tucker and Henry Salvia to create Houston Jones, like the Waybacks, a very popular West coast Americana band. The band twice played Mama Hillybean’s, here in Tehachapi, between 2007 and 2009.  Houston and Travis Jones played Fiddlers Crossing as a duo in 2015.
Glenn Houston has been voted Best Guitarist by the Northern California Bluegrass Society and has also won a Bay Area Music Award as a founding member of Hearts on Fire. He has shared the stage with the likes of Emmy-Lou Harris, Merle Haggard, The David Grisman Quintet, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Bela Fleck, Earl Scruggs, Doc Watson, Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings, to name a few. Originally from New Jersey, his influences range from Albert King and Michael Bloomfield to Doc Watson and James Burton. These influences show in his well- balanced mastery of both acoustic and electric guitar. His classical music background includes choral vocal performances with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and The Boston Symphony. In recent years, he has performed and recorded with Grammy winner Ramblin’ Jack Elliott and blues legends Mark Naftalin and Nick Gravenites in tribute to blues great Michael Bloomfield.

Stevie Coyle grew up in Southern California with music all around him. His father owned a Spanish-language radio station and brought home all the records that didn’t fit the format to his son. At a tender age he was listening to The Ventures’ “Guitar Freakout”, “The 50 Guitars of Tommy Garrett”, even “Alvin and the Chipmunks Play the Beatles Hits”. It also didn’t hurt that string-meister David Lindley (lead guitarist for Jackson Browne in the 1970’s) played in a bluegrass band that rehearsed next door and gave Stevie his first lessons or that his grandmother was a pianist in the heyday of vaudeville and that his mother played in mandolin orchestras in the 1920’s. In high school he started fingerpicking his guitar, influenced by the first Hot Tuna album.  In addition to his work with The Waybacks, he has also worked closely over the past 25 years, with musical satirist, Roy Zimmerman, including the Folk tribute parody band, The Foremen and comedy duo, The Reagan Brothers. Coyle spent time in folk duos, The Frontmen and The Back Room boys before co-founding The Waybacks in 1998. He’s also acted in TV shows such as Cheers, The Young and The Restless, not to mention many commercials. In short, Stevie Coyle has been one busy guy over the years. Now, having retired from The Waybacks, he has teamed with his old friend, Glenn Houston to form, appropriately enough, The Quitters.

Like Lennon and McCartney, Harrison and Starr, Glenn Houston and Stevie Coyle each left their respective bands, after many years, to join each other onstage. It’s often said “Every ending is a new beginning”. While the departure of each signaled the end of a musical era, the pairing of Houston and Coyle is the beginning of a new and exciting one for them and, certainly, for audiences everywhere. The Quitters will join us here, at Fiddlers Crossing, on June 8 and it is sure to be an evening to be remembered.
For more information and to hear samples of The Quitters, go to  www.quittersduo.com  or www.fiddlerscrossing.com.

 

Fiddlers Crossing is at 206 East F Street at Robinson Street, in Downtown Tehachapi. Tickets may be purchased next door at Mountain Music, at Tehachapi Treasure Trove, Tehachapi Furniture in Old Town, and Lucky’s Barbershop, or online through Fiddlerscrossing.com. Tickets to the concert are $20, and as always, coffee and goodies are included.  The concert begins at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

 

 

Saturday, June 30, 2018, 7:00pm, Roy Zimmerman, musical satirist $20.00

ReZist poster - tehachapi

 

http://www.royzimmerman.com

RoyZimmerman_nyc-17

 

On Saturday, June 30, Fiddlers Crossing will present popular satirist Roy Zimmerman in his fifth appearance in Tehachapi. Zimmerman played to sold-out crowds at Mama Hillybeans several years ago, and a couple of times at Fiddlers Crossing.

Zimmerman finds just about everything and everyone funny in one way or another. As a satirist in the vein of Tom Lehrer, but with a decidedly more political point of view, his “funny songs about ignorance, war and greed” skewer our major politicians and celebrities, as well as highlight absurdities in the issues of the day.

Among his many credits and satirical endeavors, Zimmerman was the founder of the comedy folk quartet, The Foremen, a group that toured extensively in the 1990s, playing the nation’s major folk venues, and as he says, “a lot of fancy Progressive benefits.”  They also performed at  Pete Seeger’s Clearwater Festival, under an overpass in the rain.  Zimmerman wrote over five hours of satire for the group. “We never did it all at once,” he reports, “but we kept it ready in case we had to filibuster.”

Fiddlers Crossing is at 206 East F Street at Robinson Street, in Downtown Tehachapi. Tickets are $20 and may be purchased next door at Mountain Music, Tehachapi Treasure Trove, Tehachapi Furniture in Old Town, and Lucky’s Barbershop, or with a credit card by calling 661-823-9994. Tickets may also be purchased directly from the website, at fiddlerscrossing.org, via PayPal. And as always, coffee and goodies are included.  The concert begins at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Friday, July 13, 2018, 7:00pm, Jackie Bristow, singer-songwriter, with Mark Punch, guitarist $20.00

Jackie 11

https://www.jackiebristow.com/

 

At once heartfelt and sophisticated, Jackie Bristow combines subtle but beautiful melodies and hooks that hypnotise the listener, demand complete surrender and then stick around with the backbone of a real friend. 

Born in New Zealand but then transplanted to Australia and now the United States with a guitar, suitcase and songs, Jackie travels light but packs a heavy punch.

Jackie has had the honor to be the opening act for many of her musical hero’s. Opening for Bonnie Raitt in New Zealand on her 2013  “Slipstream” tour was a dream-come-true.  Jackie was invited back 2017 to join Bonnie Raitt on her “Dig in Deep” tour.  Jackie opened for Foreigner 2017 the Steve Miller Band in the US 2016.

Jackie has been the opening act for many other well-known names over the years: Marc Cohn, John Oates, John Waite, Bettye Lavette, B.J. Thomas, Joe Ely, Marcia Ball, Charlie Robison, Rick Springfield, Bob Schneider, Jimmy Lafave, Euge Groove, Ruthie Foster, Howard Jones, Herbert Gronemeyer, Phoebe Snow, Art Garfunkel, Daniel Lanois, Madeline Peryoux, Jimmy Webb, Paul Williams, and Shawn Mullins, among others.

 Jackie’s live performances captivate audiences. One reviewer of her show on the Tommy Emmanuel tour wrote: “Opening for a musical giant like Emmanuel would seem a daunting task, but Bristow was relaxed as her soulfully-seductive melodies reverberated within the auditorium. Her beautiful voice and earnest songs resonated with the audience, and they applauded her eagerly. Near the end of the show, Bristow joined Emmanuel on stage for an amazing duet that received a standing ovation.”

Jackie’s songs have been used repeatedly in Australian and New Zealand film and television hit shows such as “Go Girls,” “The Secret Life of Us,” “Home and Away,” “Outrageous Fortune,” “Shortland Street,” and “Go Big.” Her original song “This is Australia” won Tourism Australia’s nationwide competition and was featured in its worldwide promotional campaigns for three years. Songs from the “Crazy Love” and “Freedom” albums were programmed into rotation at 7,000 Starbucks locations nationwide in the US.

In 2014, Jackie was awarded New Zealand Southland Music Ambassador of the Year.

 Jackie has proven to be an artist who shows no signs of stopping. 2017 Jackie relocated to the music mecca, Nashville, Tennessee.

Jackie released her fourth studio album “Shot of Gold” 2016.  It charted her home country New Zealand and received critical acclaim.

 

“Opening for a musical giant like Emmanuel would seem a daunting task, but Bristow was relaxed as her soulfully-seductive melodies reverberated within the auditorium. Her beautiful voice and earnest songs resonated with the audience, and they applauded her eagerly. Near the end of the show, Bristow joined Emmanuel on stage for an amazing duet that received a standing ovation.”  CHICO, USA

“Bristow, no matter, holds the balance right with her own fluid stride and a bounce on stage that keeps things kicking and bright.  She is a formidable leader live, and at her roadhouse best, a mere glass – throw off, arm’s reach from the hip – thrusting, head-swinging crush.” – Christopher Hassett – USA

“Bristow’s command of the stage is well-earned. She has a strong, clear voice with just a tinge of Nashville in her inflections and a tone that recalls Dolly Parton, but with a bit more mid-range. – There’s a lot of talk these days about the impressive Americana artists coming out of Lyttelton…and they are very good indeed…but Jackie Bristow has been putting in the hard yards for years now, first in Gore, then Sydney and then in Austin and now LA. Shot Of Gold is the culmination of all that hard work…beautifully crafted songs, sung with passion in a voice that goes straight to the heart.”  Marty Duda – NZ

Friday, August 3, 2018, 7:00pm, First Friday Showcase, featuring Aireene Espiritu, FREE EVENT, tips for the performers are strongly encouraged

Aireene 2

https://www.aireeneespiritu.com/

 

Aireene is a singer/songwriter playing mostly original songs accompanied by latin/african rhythms, folk, bluegrass pickings and inspirations from gospel music – a mix of stompin’, swayin’, and timeless Americana.

 She was born in the Philippines and moved to the United States at 10 years old, growing up in the third culture: the old country, the new country and a blend of both worlds. Mainly influenced by listening to Alan Lomax’s field recordings from the South and growing up listening to her uncles’ Filipino folk guitar fingerpicking, her music is reminiscent of front porch storytelling, of ghosts and the living, times of laughter and tears. She tours solo as well as with her band as Aireene & The Itch, a mix of San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles musicians.

“This is our jaw dropping act of the season…she gathered some of the best musicians in town around her…She has taken off like a rocket ship and everyone is suddenly in love with the music and show of Aireene Espiritu…You might like to say, “Remember When” a short way up the musical road.”  – Bob Stane, The Coffee Gallery Backstage

“Espiritu’s vocal range tells the story, eliciting the invincibility of a young Dolly Parton and blue-collar work ethic of Loretta Lynn.” – Adam Joseph, Monterey County Weekly

“Espiritu’s penchant for songs that sound like they came off a 78 rpm record, listeners will be swept away.” – Good Times Weekly, Santa Cruz CA

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 7:00pm, S-E-A Folkgrass (Steve Eulberg, Erin and Amber Rogers) $20.00

S.E.A.-Color-38_crop-1024x545

https://owlmountainmusic.com/s-e-a-folkgrass/

 

S.E.A.-Color-82_crop

 

S·E·A is comprised of long-time folk musician Steve Eulberg and musical sisters Erin and Amber Rogers.

Steve Eulberg stands within the tradition of handmade, acoustic, home-grown music, giving life to old songs and tunes and songs by passing them on. He also stretches the boundaries of musical instrumentation by playing jazz, blues and bossa nova on traditional instruments.

He brings virtuosity and surprise to performance and thoughtful songwriting which utilize humor, bringing new perspectives to embrace the broken lives and tattered fringes of life and re-weave them into strands of hope.

The warm vibrations and resonance of wood & strings inspire a hope he is compelled to share with audiences.The hammered dulcimer is present in cultures across the globe, the mountain dulcimer has crossed cultural boundaries to be adopted by people outside of its origins.

There is an ancestral resonance that people feel when hearing these instruments which brings a human tribal unity to those in the audience.

Steve met the sisters when they were just beginning to play their instruments.

At first, the three met up occasionally at music festivals across the country and made it a point to play some tunes together.

As the years went on, they formed an intentional partnership and for 3 years have been scheduling performances and tours together.

 

Saturday, August 25, 2018, Amber Cross, singer songwriter with James Moore $20.00

ambercrossskull

https://www.ambercrossmusic.com

 

Authenticity is A difficult thing to measure in American roots music. It’s not in the hat you wear, or the twang in your voice. It’s in how well you understand that the music comes from the land, and that its roots run deep. Americana songwriter Amber cross understands this, and on her new album, Savage on the Downhill, she makes music as beholden to the landscapes of Northern and Pacific California, where she lives and travels, as to the visually-rich songwriting

she crafts around it. Her songs hang heavy with the yellow dust of dirt roads, plunge deep into the soft loam of the forest. As a hunter, a fisherman, and a woman of the backcountry,

she knows the countryside well, and has a deep respect for the honest work that makes you a steward of the land. It’s something she shares with other roots musicians, a community
she found attending her first Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nevada. Her contacts from the gathering helped her connect with Savage on the Downhill’s producer, Canadian blues and roots musician rAy bonneville. Traveling to Austin to record the album with Bonneville, Cross connected with other great American songwriters, gurf morlix and tim o’brien, who both came onboard for the album, with O’Brien complimenting her “no bullshit style of singing.” If there’s a rawness to Cross’ voice, a plainness to the words, it comes from the fact that Cross knows the roots of this music aren’t fancy. They’re built by hand and filled with honest words and hard-won truths.

The songs on Savage on the Downhill are deeply visual and inextricably tied to nature, whether the California forests that Cross roams through, or

the high deserts outside Austin, Texas, where she recorded the album. Even the title of the album paints a picture of Cross in the backcountry. “Savage” refers to a brand of hunting rifle, and the phrase “Savage on the Downhill” refers to how a tracker should hold a rifle so as not to bury the barrel into the dirt when side-hilling or climbing down an incline. Like any artist that works with their hands, Cross has a deep love and respect for tools, seeing the same artistry in a well-worn rifle butt that you would in a perfectly crafted song. “I have always been drawn to work that involves my hands,” Cross says. “It seems to me that this type of work is more creative. Or maybe it is that working with my hands pulls the creativity out of me in a way nothing else does.”

Throughout, Cross moves easily through different styles of country
and folk songwriting, from Bakersfield outlaw attitude to Woody Guthrie plain-spoken folk. She’s a songwriter able to juxtapose a simple image
with a powerful poetic emotion. On “Echoes,” she paints the picture of a humble domestic scene, then wonders what happens to a house when the people who made it a home have
left it behind. On “Pack of Lies,” she moves between hard-hitting lines like “Pretending to love is a wicked game” and vision-laden verses like “Barking dogs rule the moonless night.”

It may come as no surprise that Amber cross first came to music through singing in a small church in rural Maine, where she was born and raised. Her father was a small-town pastor and she was raised on the rough-hewn homilies of the hymnal. Now, Cross is creating her world by hand, working her songs until they shine with a worn polish, finding truth in tradition.

“Every once in a while music comes along that you just know instantly that you are going to like.  Amber’s melodies are more than complimented by thoughtful, interesting and honest lyrics, along with fine, understated musicianship that proves the old adage that “less is more”.  The result is a set of superbly crafted, well-rounded, addictive songs that stay with you long after the last notes have ended, and make you hungry for more.” -Duncan Warwick, Country Music People Magazine, UK 

Upon first hearing Amber Cross you might think you are listening to an archival Smithsonian recording. Her old-time voice is clear and captivating, like a strong muscle, fringed in lace. She’s a singer and songwriter who writes from her own life’s struggles and experiences, delivering her stories with unforgettable power and emotion.

Originally from Maine, Amber spent her early years surrounded by gospel music in a small town church where her father preached and her mother played piano. In 2003 Amber left her studies at New Mexico State University to pursue her love for music.  She moved up and down the coast of California; the San Francisco Bay Area, the Sierra Foothills, the San Joaquin River Valley, the coastal range of Sonoma County, and now San Luis Obispo County. She has opened for such artists as Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Gurf Morlix, Mary Gauthier and Dave Stamey, as well as made frequent guest performances with The Wronglers, Warren Hellman’s band, founder of San Francisco’s Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival.
Amber released her debut album You Can Come In in March of 2013.  Country Music People Magazine/UK, discovered the album and gave it a 5 Star Review and CD Of The Month, saying “Every now and again a debut CD arrives and you know about 30 seconds in that you are experiencing something a bit special… it’s appeal is likely to be broad, from bluegrass, rootsy Appalachian, to country or honky-tonk.”

Sunday, September 9, 2018, 3:00pm, David Grier, acoustic guitarist $20.00

dg-4891-suit-1b

https://www.davidgrier.com

 

Born in Washington, D.C. in 1961, a family move to Nashville at age 3 fully immersed DavidGrier into the bluegrass music world, and at age 6, he began playing the guitar. Today, he is regarded as one of the premier acoustic guitarists in the world, along with his early influences,Doc Watson, Tony Rice, and family friend Clarence White. Recognized by Acoustic Guitar Magazine in 2000 as one of the Artists of the Decade, and named Guitar Player of the Year three times by the International Bluegrass Music Association, Grier has played on four Grammy Award-winning albums (True Life Blues: A Tribute to Bill Monroe; The Great Dobro Sessions; Alison Brown’s Fairweather; and Amazing Grace 2: A Country Salute to Gospel).

Having released four albums on Rounder, beginning in 1988 with Freewheeling, Grier launched his own label, Dreadnought Recordings, with the 1998 debut release, Hootenanny, with Dirk Powell and Tim O’Brien (“endlessly inventive and tasteful” – All Music Guide). His most recent release, Evocative (Dreadnought 2009), featuring 10 original tunes and a rich complement of collaborators (Victor Wooten, Paul Franklin, Stuart Duncan and more), has been hailed for its “deep musical introspection” as well as its “unmatchable mastery of the guitar” (Martin Mull). Other Dreadnought releases include the highly-acclaimed Live at the Linda (2007) and I’ve Got the House to Myself (2002) (“unfettered explosive invention” – Tim O’Brien).

“His unmatchable mastery of the guitar is ever present, but it’s the emotional exploration of themusic as a whole that leaves a lasting impression. There is evidence everywhere of deep musical introspection: real soul-searching, and, I would have to say, bravery.”~ Martin Mull

“David Grier is a willful, accurate instrumentalist whose every note seems to run through a bright, intelligent sieve. He maintains an unqualified standard of excellence in guitar playing, always with a knack for unorthodox surprise.”
~ Claire Lynch

“Grier sculpts fascinating forms the way air and moisture combine to create billowing cumuli.”
~Jazz Review

“I’ve had the good fortune to see David Grier live several times, and while I certainly delight in watching him play, I especially like to watch folks who have never seen him live before. There’s this denial/acceptance cycle as they try to rationalize what they “know” to be possible with the guitar versus what their eyes and ears are experiencing. . . . And he does it in this self-effacing way that almost undercuts his musical inventiveness [and] preternatural skill.”
~Chris Thiessen, Flatpick Guitar Magazine

Saturday, September 29, 2018, 7:00pm, Jeni Hankins, Appalachian Folk $20.00

Jeni-FX-2

http://www.jeniandbilly.com/

 

Picture a grandmother who could cure thrush in babies by breathing into their mouths, a cousin who was struck twice by lightning and survived, a grandfather who was shot down on the road to his home, an aunt who left the life of a miner’s wife to become a movie star, and a grandmother who spoke to a mysterious man named Charlie through a plastic banana.
These are the ancestors of Appalachian singer Jeni (Smith) Hankins, who will be sharing her rich, poetic background in Fiddlers Crossing, Saturday, September 29, at 7 pm.  This will be Jeni’s second visit to Fiddlers Crossing.

Jeni grew up in the birthplace of country music, a county over from the Carter Family and just across the Kentucky border from Jean Ritchie and Loretta Lynn. With a voice often compared to Hazel Dickens and a poetic wit often compared to Flannery O’Connor, Jeni brings authentic Southern Appalachian grace and grit to her music. As Kristi Higgins of the Village Reporter described it, hearing Jeni’s songs is like “listening to a photograph album,” an album full of gingerbread, birthdays, funeral processions, callused hands, dinner buckets, and crisp white shirts hung out on the line.

Come to Fiddlers Crossing September 29 for a musical evening in the mountains of the Appalachian coalfields.

For videos and samples, go to jeniandbilly.com and fiddlerscrossing.com.
Fiddlers Crossing is at 206 East F Street at Robinson Street, in Downtown Tehachapi. Tickets may be purchased next door at Mountain Music, at Tehachapi Treasure Trove, Tehachapi Furniture in Old Town, and Lucky’s Barbershop, or online through Fiddlerscrossing.com. Tickets to the concert are $20, and as always, coffee and goodies are included.  The concert begins at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. sharp.

“Born in the bone twang-an heiress to the Mountain Music Crown”-Sing Out Magazine

https://youtu.be/LnGggHsWhWM

Friday, October 5, 2018, 7:00pm, First Friday Showcase featuring The Invocations, FREE EVENT (tips for the performers are strongly encouraged)

Invocations

 

The Invocations are a trio focused on uplifting, inspirational and heartfelt compositions drenched in the folk traditions of the Britsh Isles and America, made up of members Bob Schetter, Marilyn Owen and Shane Bruce, all singer-songwriters in their own right. Whether it be their own songs, or re-worked material from some of the master Folk artists, they feature rich three part harmonies and creative arrangements.

Bob Schetter is well-known here in Tehachapi for his guitar work and increasingly creative songwriting. He led a blues band in the ’90’s, when he was know as “Little Red”. He’s placed at the Topanga Fiddle and Banjo Competition three years running for singing, flat-picking, finger-style guitar and  accompaniment of harmonica great, Ken Lieboff.

Marilyn Owen has been a performer of her own songs and an acting coach since her teens. Today, she inspires audiences with her amazingly warm and rich vocal ability. Her life’s work is currently focused on the value of creativity and paths to capture one’s own spirit.

Shane Bruce is an accomplished singer-songwriter, having been signed to Warner Bros. records during his New York years. His music is lyrical and dramatically performed. He is currently involved in political action and supporting positive paths for youth.

From time to time, The Invocations expand to include Ken Lieboff and local Tehachapi great, Bumpy Worthington.

Sunday, October 7, 2018, 7:00pm, Beth Wood, singer-songwriter $20.00

Beth-Wood_2040smile

http://www.bethwoodmusic.com/

 

Beth Wood is a study in contradictions. She’s a home-body with an ever-present wanderlust, an introvert with a passion for performing, a creative free-spirit with enough discipline to rework her dream year after year. Her exceptional musicianship, crafty songwriting and commanding stage presence have been winning over audiences for the last 19 years. Her music has been called soulful, organic, intelligent – a high-energy communication of joy.

Fiddlers Crossing will be bringing Beth Wood back to Tehachapi for her second visit on Sunday, October 7 at 7pm.  Wood hails originally from Lubbock, a high plains west-Texas town with a musical heritage that includes Buddy Holly, Natalie and Lloyd Maines, Mac Davis and Joe Ely, among others. When she wasn’t dodging tornadoes and dust storms, she was studying classical piano, violin, harp and voice, and as she says, “contemplating the greatness of my Dad’s record collection.”

She studied voice and piano at Brevard College in North Carolina, then detoured from her classical studies to Austin, where she picked up a degree in literature – and a guitar. This led her to start writing poetry and her own songs, and she has been hooked ever since. Now, 18 years, thousands of shows, nine albums, three cars and numerous awards later, Wood had never looked back.

Beth Wood now resides in Portland OR, and says, she is loving the Northwest life. She’s deeply involved in the local music scene there as a voice teacher, and as a workshop leader at festivals and retreats.

But there is still Texas in Beth Wood. Indie-music.com says of her, “Lord have mercy…Wood is a down-home, old-fashioned girl with a wicked streak.” Yes, and when performing, usually bare feet.

    For more, see www.bethwoodmusic.com and www.fiddlerscrossing.com.

Fiddlers Crossing is at 206 East F Street at Robinson Street, in Downtown Tehachapi. Tickets may be purchased next door at Mountain Music, at Tehachapi Treasure Trove, Tehachapi Furniture in Old Town, and Lucky’s Barbershop, or online through Fiddlerscrossing.com. Tickets to the concert are $20, and as always, coffee and goodies are included.  The concert begins at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

 

A superb singer/songwriter whose versatility discourages labeling.” — Fort Worth Star-Telegram

“Beth Wood is a musical triple-threat — a thoughtful songwriter and talented multi-instrumentalist with a supple, soulful voice.” — Washington Post

“Wood is about as good as it gets .” –Charlotte Creative Loafing

“Lord have mercy…Wood is a down-home, old-fashioned girl with a wicked streak” — Indie-music.com

“…when you come across a recording like Beth Wood’s “The Weather Inside” you take note and recognize that this is the work of a genuine artist with a remarkable voice determined to make meaningful and lasting art.” –Lone Star Music Magazine

 

 

Saturday, October 27, 2018, 7:00pm, James Lee Stanley “Freelance human being”, singer-songwriter, Presented at The BeeKay Theatre, 110 S. Green St., Tehachapi $20.00

JLS 3

https://jamesleestanley.com/

BeeKaylitSign

 

“It is simple, really. With James Lee you get great songs, great guitar playing, great voice and a gifted comedian as well. You are in for a very entertaining evening.” – Village Voice

James Lee Stanley , “Freelance human being”, returns to Fiddlers Crossing, Saturday, October 27, at 7 pm.  He has given concerts in Fiddlers Crossing, Mama Hillybean’s and the BeeKay Theatre over the last decade.  He has become a favorite in Tehachapi because of his remarkable ability as a vocalist, songwriter, composer and guitarist, matched with his hilarious repartee. The audience will be treated to an evening of tenderness, humor and storytelling. He has been hailed as one of the all-time greats on the singer-songwriter circuit, and is certainly an extraordinary entertainer.

James Lee Stanley hails from Philadelphia, Pa, and has been performing since he was 14 years old.  Along the way, he was in the USAF as a Chinese linguist, and was an actor in some Star Trek: Next Generation episodes. He gives up to 300 concerts per year, and has opened for or played with a diverse roster of performers ranging from Bonnie Raitt to Robin Williams.

A true Renaissance man, Stanley writes a blog called “Datamusicata: Tips, Hints, clues and Info for the Artist in us all.” The site has recently crossed the 1,1000,000 hits mark and can be found at www.datamusicata.com. And if musician, actor, writer, linguist, humorist, isn’t enough, James Lee Stanley is also a fine artist.

For more about James Lee Stanley, go to www.jamesleestanley.com.

The concert starts at 7:00 p.m., with doors opening at 6:30. Tickets are $20, available at Tehachapi Treasure Trove, Tehachapi Furniture, Lucky’s Barbershop, or at the Fiddler’s Crossing Wednesday Open Mics and First Fridays. Tickets are also available online at Fiddlers Crossing.com, and may be reserved by calling 661-823-9994.  Fiddlers Crossing is at 206 East F Street, Downtown Tehachapi at Robinson. Buying tickets early is strongly suggested.

 

 

 

Sunday, November 18, 2018 3:00pm, West My Friend, Canadian eclectic acoustic ensemble $20.00

West My Friend Trio

http://www.westmyfriend.com/

 

The Fiddlers Crossing poster for West My Friend reads: “Canadian eclectic acoustic ensemble.” The quartet of young and accomplished musicians from Vancouver Island has also been called an “Indie folk pop band,” or simply “Indie roots.” Other music reviewers have called the band, “Third-wave indie rock pop with four-part harmonies,” and their style, “Cascadian third-wave indie progressive chamber folk-roots music.”

Obviously, West My Friend defies being pigeon-holed into any one genre. Their blend of acoustic instruments accompanying lush four-part harmonies challenges the conventions of today’s popular music, as can be seen in concert at Fiddlers Crossing on Sunday, November 18 at 3 pm.  This will be the bands second appearance at the venue. Their catchy songs and arrangements of bass, guitar, mandolin and accordion draw from jazz, classical, folk and pop influences.

Since 2010, when Eden Oliver, Alex Rempel, Jeff Poynter, and Adam Bailey came together to form West My Friend, they have become a key part of a new generation of grassroots folk music on the adventurous acoustic music scene of Canada’s west coast. The band is now a trio.

Classical training and a wealth of diverse musical experience gives them their distinct voice, with passages of intricacy and counterpoint balanced with moments of sweet and exquisite simplicity. Innovation and humor mix easily and seamlessly with traditional genres, echoing old world Klezmer, Cape Breton dance tunes, anthems that sound like show tunes, emotional folk songs, and bluegrass vocal harmonies – with a bit of roots-twang thrown in for good measure. Think “Mumford and Sons” with a female lead singer.

Their name, West My Friend, is a play on “Go West, Young Man.” These four musicians are all westerners through-and-through, and have toured throughout Canada, as well as the US and Europe. Their favorite mode of travel and touring, weather permitting? Cycling – with instruments in tow!

Fiddlers Crossing is at 206 East F Street at Robinson Street, in Downtown Tehachapi. Tickets may be purchased next door at Mountain Music, at Tehachapi Treasure Trove, Tehachapi Furniture in Old Town, and Lucky’s Barbershop, or online through Fiddlerscrossing.com. Tickets to the concert are $20, and as always, coffee and goodies are included.  The concert begins at 3 p.m. Doors open at 2:30 p.m.

 

Sunday, December 23, 2018, 2:00 and 7:00pm, “Winterdance” with Molly’s Revenge, Christa Burch and The Rosemary Turco Irish Dancers $25.00, adults, $15.00, students, presented at The BeeKay Theatre, 110 S. Green St., Tehachapi

Mollys2012-10Christa_Burch

 

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These tickets are not on sale yet.

“Winterdance,” a Celtic Christmas celebration, will return to Tehachapi for two performances in the BeeKay Theatre on Sunday, December 23. The concert, put on by Fiddlers Crossing, has been a sell-out the last four years. As in the past years, two performances will be presented, at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets are $25 for adults and $15 for students.

The core of the concert is the traditional Celtic trio, Molly’s Revenge. They will again be joined by vocalist Christa Burch, along with the Rosemary Turco Irish dancers from San Jose, in an evening of music, song and dance associated with the festive season. The performance will include Christmas songs both old and new, all played with a Celtic twist, as well as selections from the band’s holiday album.

Molly’s Revenge is a dynamic, acoustic Celtic band complete with bagpipes, whistle, fiddle, guitar, mandola, and bodhran, to guarantee a rousing afternoon for all fans of Scottish and Irish music. They have performed at many of the top folk festivals and performing arts events in the USA, as well as at prestigious events in Scotland, Australia and China.

The band is comprised of a trio of Californians in love with Celtic music. David Brewer plays whistle and four types of bagpipes. He studied in Scotland under the tutelage of some of the best pipers in the world. His unique style of playing has earned him a reputation as one of the most accomplished pipers on the West Coast.

John Weed is a classically trained violinist who switched to playing Irish fiddle about 15 years ago. He has lived in Ireland, teaching workshops in Irish fiddle — to the Irish! He studied with master fiddlers in County Donegal and hones his skills there annually.

Stuart Mason has been collecting and performing traditional music for over 30 years. He has appeared on stage from Ireland to China performing Celtic, old-time, bluegrass, and his own  compositions, which have won awards from the West Coast Songwriters Association. He also  leads workshops and classes in traditional music techniques at music festivals and camps.  Mason and Weed previous played Fiddlers Crossing with Kenny Blackwell as old-time trio Little Black Train.

Christa Burch is no stranger to Tehachapi, having been the vocal and bodhran instructor for Camp Kiya in 2012. She has performed with Alasdair Fraser and Natalie Haas, as well as with the Scottish Fiddlers of Los Angeles, who often perform at the Bakersfield Scottish Games. Her band, The Syncopaths, is a favorite for California contra dances. In her travels through Scotland and Ireland, Christa has collected a wide repertoire of songs and developed her own style.

If you have seen Winterdance, you will certainly want to revisit this fantastic Celtic Christmas Celebration. If you haven’t, you won’t want to miss it this year, so be sure to get your tickets early. Because nothing says “Christmas” like bagpipes – plus fiddles, guitars, bodhrans, whistles, singers and dancers in a brilliant Celtic spirit!

The BeeKay Theatre is at 110 S. Green Street, in Downtown Tehachapi. Tickets may be purchased online at fiddlerscrossing.com, at Mountain Music during Wednesday Open Mic Nights, as well as at Tehachapi Treasure Trove, Tehachapi Furniture in Old Town, and Lucky’s Barbershop. To reserve tickets or pay by phone, call 661-823-9994 and leave your name and the number of tickets requested. Tickets to the concert are $25 for adults and $15 for students.  The concert times are 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Doors open one-half hour ahead.

 

 

Friday, January 11, 2019, 7:00pm Alasdair Fraser and Natalie Haas, Scottish fiddle and cello duo $30.00 (venue TBA)

imgallery-alfritm1

https://alasdairandnatalie.com

These tickets are not on sale yet.

Scottish fiddler Alasdair Fraser and cellist Natalie Haas are making their fourth appearance in Tehachapi  Friday, January 11 at 7:00 p.m Venue TBA.

Alasdair Fraser is a major force behind the resurgence of traditional Scottish fiddling in his homeland as well as in the U.S., inspiring legions of listeners and learners through his recordings, fiddle camps, and concerts. He is in demand as a performer and teacher all over the world. He weaves through his performances a warm and witty narrative, drawing from a deep well of stories and lore surrounding Scotland’s musical heritage.

From Boston to San Diego, when you hear American fiddlers playing Scottish tunes, odds are they have attended one of Fraser’s camps or been taught by one of his students. The Scottish Fiddlers of California, which he heads up, has several offshoots throughout the state. One of those, the Los Angeles Scottish Fiddlers, regularly performs at the Bakersfield Scottish Games. Tehachapi’s own Camp Kiya is inspired by the Scottish Fiddle camps Fraser started, with students of both Fraser and Haas providing instruction.

Cellist Natalie Haas, a California native and graduate of the Juilliard School of Music, wasn’t even born when Fraser was winning national fiddle competitions on the other side of the Atlantic. But this seemingly unlikely pairing is the fulfillment of a long-standing musical dream for Fraser, which was to find a cellist who could help him return the cello to its historical role at the rhythmic heart of Scottish dance music.
Now, he says, “cellists are coming out of the woodwork to study with Natalie, to learn how she creates a groove and a whole chunky rhythm section,” says Fraser. “It’s inspiring to hear the cello unleashed from its orchestral shackles.”

Sunday, January 27, 2019, 3:00pm, Jim Malcolm, Scottish Folksinger-songwriter $20.00

JimMalcsepia

https://www.jimmalcolm.com/

 These tickets are not on sale yet.

Fiddlers Crossing tries to honor its Celtic roots by offering an Irish concert on or around St. Patrick’s Day in March, a Scottish one to celebrate Robbie Burns’ birthday at the end of January, and presenting the Winterdance Celtic concert at Christmas.

This year, to honor Robbie Burns and Scotland, the venue is bringing back, Jim Malcom on Sunday, January 27, at 3 pm. Malcom is considered one of the finest voices and interpreters of Robert Burns songs in Scottish traditional music today.  He was the lead singer for the world-renowned band Old Blind Dogs for eight years before returning to his solo career as a singer-songwriter.

Malcolm’s family roots are in Perthshire and Strathclyde, and he is a graduate of Edinburgh University. Like many folk musicians, he began his career by singing in pubs, clubs and hotels in his native country. Solo tours to England, Ireland, Denmark and Germany followed, and then further adventures to such far-off places as Uganda in Africa. Joining the already established and popular Celtic folk/rock band Old Blind Dogs brought him fame in the acoustic music festival scene across Europe and North America.

A Jim Malcolm concert is always an entertaining mix of his own and traditional songs, including those of Burns, peppered with funny stories and observations in the tradition of Scottish bards through the ages. An accomplished guitarist, he plays mostly in the Celtic tuning dadgad. He is also considered to be one of the top simultaneous guitar and harmonica players in the world.

Malcom has recorded ten solo CDs, and has performed his songs with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra. In 2004, he was voted songwriter of the year at the annual Scots Traditional Music Awards. Along with his own songs, he enjoys reworking old songs that form the kernel of Scotland’s great folk tradition.

At home in Scotland, Malcom enjoys spending time with his children and fly fishing on the rivers and lochs of Perthshire. In winter he has lately been heading for the Glenshee Ski Resort with a snowboard and, he says, “a great deal of padding.” Apparently, the ice on Scotland’s slopes make for “quite a hard landing.”

Fiddlers Crossing is at 206 East F Street at Robinson Street, in Downtown Tehachapi. Tickets may be purchased next door at Mountain Music, at Tehachapi Treasure Trove, Tehachapi Furniture in Old Town, and Lucky’s Barbershop, or online through Fiddlerscrossing.com. Tickets to the concert are $20, and as always, coffee and goodies are included.  The concert begins at 3 p.m. Doors open at 2:30 p.m.

Friday, February 8, 2019, 7:00pm, Jann Klose, singer-songwriter $20.00

Jann_Klose_by_Yael_Shulman

http://jannklose.com/

 These tickets are not on sale yet.

Jann Klose is an award-winning pop singer-songwriter, who has released five albums and two EPs. Jann was raised in Kenya, South Africa, Germany, and the United States and now resides in New York City. His music has been streamed over 1,000,000 times online and his song ‘Make It Better’ is featured on the Billboard Top 10 charting compilation album ‘Action Moves People United.’ His new single ‘Don’t Give Up’ (Peter Gabriel) featuring vocal legend and visual artist Annie Haslam of the classical rock group Renaissance, is now available worldwide and his new album IN TANDEM will be released by Gallo Records in 2018. Jann is an ambassador for Desmond Tutu’s Tutudesk campaign.

Jann’s most recent solo album, MOSAIC featuring ‘Make It Better’ entered the Roots Rock charts at #22 and won three 2014 Independent Music Awards. The record also made the first round of the 2014 Grammys® in the categories Pop Vocal Album and Album Of The Year.

His voice is featured in the movie ‘Greetings From Tim Buckley’ (Universal) as the voice of Tim Buckley starring Penn Badgley and Imogen Poots. His songs have been heard on the Grammy® nominated ‘Healthy Food For Thought’ compilation as well as MTV Cribs and movies ‘Dead Broke’ (Warner Bros) featuring Paul Sorvino and ‘A Venue For The End Of The World’ (BrinkVision) featuring Dick Cavett and Ian Anderson. Most recently Jann scored the music for the award-winning short ‘The Beauty of Disaster.’

He has performed as an actor and singer in touring companies of Broadway musicals, including ‘Jesus Christ Superstar,’ ‘Jekyll & Hyde,’ and ‘The Who’s Tommy.’ In 2005, the off-Broadway production ‘Moonlight Interior,’ a musical based on Klose’s music, premiered in New York City.

Jann Klose has periodically collaborated with members of classical rock group Renaissance and tours regularly in the U.S., Europe, Africa and Asia. He has worked with a wide range of artists including Pat Benatar, John Oates of Hall and Oates, Suzanne Vega, Paula Cole, Annie Haslam, Ann & Liz Callaway, Gary Lucas, Brett Dennen, Rusted Root, Vonda Shepard, Ben Taylor, RJ Benjamin, Karen Zoid, Tamara Day, ZIYON (Liquideep), Shekhinah, Amanda Black, Majozi, Jeffrey Gaines, Bret Michaels, Rosanne Cash, The Byrds’ Roger McGuinn, Marty Stuart (Johnny Cash), The Yardbirds’ Jim McCarty, Pete Seeger and Les Paul.

 

 

 

“Klose has a fabulous, wide-ranging voice with an individual style… 4 STARS” – Mike Barnes, MOJO Magazine

“Jann Klose was born in Germany and raised in South Africa but his music is all-American pop rock of the finest order…Combine his songwriting and singing chops with his artful experimentation— songs include flavors of reggae, punk, and more—and you understand why Klose moves ever closer to pop-rock eminence.” – Nancy Dunham, RELIX Magazine

“Singer-songwriter Klose shows he can create diverse new tunes that rival those of such masters as (Tim) Buckley. His songs offer hard-to-resist energy, memorable melodies and intelligent, well-crafted lyrics.” – Paul Freeman, San Jose Mercury News

“This German born, African-raised singer-songwriter does sentimentality with sincerity and grace … There’s little out of his range.” – Kenneth Partridge, M Music & Musicians

“Klose wins over the listener with his soaring voice, which may well be a staple of chamber pop for a long time to come.” – Alexander F. Remington, Washington Post

Friday. March 8, 2019, 7:00pm, Whitherward, Indie Folk duo, $20.00

Whitherward-1024x683

https://whitherward.com/

 These tickets are not on sale yet.

Founded in January 2014, Nashville-based singer/songwriters Ashley E. Norton and Edward A Williams, tired of the trench warfare that typifies the music industry, opted to keep things simple; an acoustic duo with meaningful music, pushing the boundaries of their own creative energy. Just a short year after creation, the indie outlaws are moving to the Wild Wild West. “Every other band is moving to Nashville, so that’s why we’re moving out,” says Ashley. The band wears all black attire adorned in buttons they’ve acquired from their travels. They perform songs that make you laugh, songs that make you cry and songs you can sing along to, from artists such as Genesis, Led Zepplin, Tom Petty, Jewel, Radio Head, as well as original compositions (see full list below). When they are not making the audience laugh with their off-the-cuff banter, Whitherward can perform anywhere from 1-4 hours of music as a duo, or a trio or full band upon request.

Currently, the pair has played in several states across the country, entertaining audiences of all sizes. Tours have already been completed through Missouri, Arizona, Tennessee, Texas, California, Colorado, Georgia, and Nevada with many more states lined up. The duo’s initial release, “Stardust”, encompasses a wide range of sounds and issues, bringing with it a raw power and acute sense of self-examination. They are currently self-producing their sophomore release, “Music Monster.”

A blend of modern americana, classic folk, and 90’s rock (ceremoniously dubbed “power folk”), the duo has a sound that appeals to many different groups from all walks of life, and therein lies the group’s greatest drive – to uncover the next great excitement, the next big fan, the next song that hits so close to our true selves. And in this pursuit, we ask: whitherward lieth the way home?

 

 

“Whitherward accomplished what, in my mind, few folk bands are capable of doing: standing out in a venue known for rock, country, and all things loud and abrasive.”
-BETH MCALLISTER, THE 99 CENT BIN

“Norton, along with Williams, have created a very intimate, emotionally charged and gutty EP, Stardust. I hadn’t heard Norton perform in person for almost three years and I held zero expectations. After all, three years is a very long time, and performers, music, and life, changes. For the good, in this case.”
-FRANK IPPOLITO, YABYUM

Saturday, June 22, 2019, 7:00pm, James Uloth, Comedian $20.00

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http://jamesuloth.com/

 Tickets for this show are not on sale yet.

Since 2003 James Uloth (you-law-th) has performed thousands of shows in 4 different countries, including hundreds of corporate events, Christmas parties, and community fundraisers. In addition to being a highly sought-after live performer, his online videos have been viewed by millions. James now divides his time between the Canadian prairies and Los Angeles.